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Art & History

What to see at Brera Astronomical Museum and Botanical Garden

News > Art & History | What to see at Brera Astronomical Museum and Botanical Garden

The Brera district is one of the most beautiful and evocative of Milan.

Palazzo Brera is the house of the Academy of Fine Arts and is also home to the Botanical Garden and the Astronomical Museum.

Brera astronomical museum in Milan

Credits: www.brera.inaf.it

Telescopes, globes and plants

At Brera Astronomical Museum you can find the ancient instruments belonging Astronomical Observatory of Brera, the oldest scientific research institute of the city for the study of the planets, and the University of Milan.
The property was founded in 2005 and was built with the intent to safeguard all specimens created by the University to have an important historical memory. The realization of the museum started in the eighties. In the first part of the museum you can admire many of the tools needed for scientific study; maps, charts, globes, calculators, microscopes and telescopes.

Topographic Map of Milanese and Mantuan has a main importance for Milan. In 1773, at the behest of Prince von Kaunitz, the Austrian government promoted the creation of a map of Lombardy. Earlier topographic maps were often blunders and this map, which was to mark and draw the region; it had to border on perfection. So It was established the necessary money to create a work which at that time was not so predictable.

What to see at Brera Astronomical Museum and Botanical Garden

Credits: www.montecantobb.it

Astronomers of Brera were involved and the paper was completed in 1796. Following the visit in its second part, you can visit the Schiaparelli dome and the telescope Merz. The dome with its telescope is on the roof of the Palazzo Brera. Set in 1874, Giovanni Virginio Schiaparelli used this tool to observe Mars and from his studies the information aboutthis planet were greatly increased.

Astronomical Museum of Milan

Credits: tracce.tv

The Brera Botanical Garden was established in 1774 by Maria Theresa of Austria who wanted to enhance the historic garden of the Palace courtyard started by the Jesuits. It was restored in 2001 and today is considered one of the most beautiful botanical gardens in Italy.

Brera botanical garden

Credits: www.thousandwonders.net

It preserves almost entirely the original structure as well as its classrooms and flower beds. The walks to the Botanical Garden avenues are suggestive in all periods of the year. The garden offers some thematic routes, some shown only in certain seasons such as the blooming of spring bulbs; it is an opportunity to observe hyacinths, daffodils and tulips that by the end of February they start blooming.

Why visit the botanical garden of Milan

Credits: www.festivaldelverdeedelpaesaggio.it

In the last years the Botanical Gardens management has carried out a study in collaboration with the International Centre of Hillegom bulbs in Holland. Another interesting theme path is the study of the bark. At Brera Botanical Garden you can find trees from everywhere. Some of these plants are very important for flowering, the other for their sizes. The purpose of this thematic route is to illustrate the visitor during the walk to the botanical garden beauty focusing on the theme of the trees bark, which protect the tree from bacterial diseases. The Botanical garden, in collaboration with the Milan Municipality, organizes also some tours for schools.

Astronomical Museum and Botanical garden website :www.brera.unimi.it

Credits preview photo: living.corriere.it

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